Read The Times of Botchan First Volume by Jirō Taniguchi Natsuo Sekikawa Online

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This is the fictionalized version of the life and times of Japanese author [b]Natsume Soseki[/b] during an era of great change in Japan from the traditional Edo period into the modern Meiji period (1867-1912). [b]Soseki[/b] is considered the Charles Dickens or Mark Twain of Japan. His image even appeared on the 1000 yen note for two decades. He is best known for his novelThis is the fictionalized version of the life and times of Japanese author [b]Natsume Soseki[/b] during an era of great change in Japan from the traditional Edo period into the modern Meiji period (1867-1912). [b]Soseki[/b] is considered the Charles Dickens or Mark Twain of Japan. His image even appeared on the 1000 yen note for two decades. He is best known for his novel [i]Botchan[/i], on whose times this book is based and the short [i]I Am A Cat[/i] which is integrated into these pages. In this [b]first volume[/b] we meet a circle of [b]Soseki[/b]'s friends and he receives the spark that will become [i]Botchan[/i]. [b]Taniguchi[/b] marries talent to a solid script by [b]Sekikawa[/b] to create a fresco of Japanese society towards the end of the Meiji period as Japan was beginning to open up to the West. What could have been simply an illustrated textbook becomes, in these capable hands, a narrative for adults of great artistic and historical significance....

Title : The Times of Botchan First Volume
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9788496427013
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 144 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Times of Botchan First Volume Reviews

  • David
    2018-12-22 06:40

    If you like Eisner you'll love Taniguchi's Botchan.

  • Tintin
    2019-01-17 03:33

    Bocchan (Master Darling) by Natsume SosekiFormat: Project Gutenberg html ebookI finally read this, after passing it over the Asian Library at UP for so many times. My English student Sakai-san mentioned it, and as he didn’t seem the type to read novels, it piqued my curiosity. It also helped that Natsume Soseki is the guy in the 1000 yen bill. It turned out that Bocchan is usually required reading for Japanese kids. Great.Sometime in the first fourth of the book, I realized that the images coming to my head were familiar. I’ve read Bocchan before (I don’t know exactly when), but I probably didn’t finish it. I guess I found the antics of an immature country school teacher of no interest and shelved the book halfway through. But I’m a better reader now, and picked up a lot of things I probably glossed over on my first reading. I liked the characterization of the Bocchan character right from the start. The backdrop of his mischievous youth frames his adult life as a country school teacher perfectly. And the Kiyo character is most endearing. I liked her constancy and simple but heartfelt love and loyalty for Bocchan, immature though he is. Her character complements the simple, honest spirit of Bocchan.Of particular technical interest to me is the voice of Bocchan as a narrator. I think he is what you’d call an unreliable narrator, his view of the world biased and stained by his own perceptions. Through the rough and gruff exterior, his morality and unchanging views of right or wrong shines through. His views are a commentary against society, which prefers convoluting simple truths and making them obscure to serve personal interests. With his black-and-white view of the world, I think I share the same kind of moral plane as Bocchan. I might even have turned out something like him, if I was more audacious, more inclined to mischief, and with a few dozen IQ points shaved off my head.What I like best of all is not even the intrigue and moral play in the main plot involving the country teachers, but the inner growth of Bocchan, visible in his reminiscences of Kiyo. Left on his own in a town full of hypocrites, he begins to see Kiyo for what she truly is – a humble person, purer and more constant than any other in the world. This touched my heart and for me is the highlight of the story of Bocchan.

  • Kathleen
    2019-01-02 07:27

    This was a really awesome, fast read. I actually almost never read right-to-left authentic Manga and this was a pretty good first. Beautiful, atmospheric, and educational, 3 things I like :)I never knew much about the Meiji period, nor about how and when Japan became "westernized," and this is the kind of graphic novel which, I think, in being a graphic novel, actually goes farther than a written history could because it can convey to the reader directly what its like to see a single person dressed in western clothes, carrying a western umbrella, suddenly pass through Tokyo. The reader sees what the choice to dress this way represents, the way such dress sticks out in public and, at the same time, that it symbolizes a force that can't be stopped. Its a fascinating read. And again, glad to run across a comic about history. This is for me a great intro to Manga and also that time period.

  • Jan
    2018-12-28 04:15

    Fascinating

  • Francis
    2019-01-13 04:36

    Good book, but if you are not well learned in Japanese culture, you will struggle with the many characters and references of the book. It is important work, but it can only be truly enjoyed by true connaisseurs of the Japanese world. Since I am fairly ignorant of that culture, it was not what it could have been.